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Personal Injury Attorneys - Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Long Island and the Bronx

Technology Being Introduced to Cut Risk of Surgical Sponges Being Left in Patients

Posted On Jan 13, 2008 @ 04:57 PM by SEO Admin

Last month's $10 million settlement of a suit brought by a woman who underwent surgery for diverticulitis of the colon wherin a surgical sponge was left behind is a reminder of how frequent this complication occurs and of how potentially dangerous it can be. A 2003 study in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that sponges and other foreign objects were left behind after abdominal surgeries at a rate of 1 for every 1,000 to 1,500 such operations. Several medical-products companies say sponges are the most common foreign objects left behind in surgeries. Sponges are made of gauze and are used to soak up blood and protect organs during surgery, but if left inside the body they can cause potentially deadly infections. Retrieving a sponge in a further surgery can cost $50,000 or more. In the case of the woman, she was on a ventilator and had signs of abdominal poisoning. Although she underwent a second surgery to remove the sponge, her kidneys failed. Over the next s

Plaintiffs' Attorneys' Motions Challenging Vioxx Settlement Cloud Issues as January 15, 2008 Deadline to Register Approaches

Posted On Jan 11, 2008 @ 02:11 PM by SEO Admin

Pursuant to the terms of the $4.85 billion Vioxx settlement, January 15, 2008 is the deadline for all plaintiffs with a Vioxx-related case to register -- whether or not their injuries would necessarily qualify for the settlement payout. This preliminary step will establish how many cases Merck, the manufacturer of Vioxx, faces. Those that don't qualify for the settlement could still go to court. More than 28,000 of the estimated 60,800 claimants have submitted registration information so far. But several plaintiffs attorneys have made a motion requesting that the federal judge overseeing the Vioxx settlement, U.S. District Judge Eldon E. Fallon of New Orleans, allow them to have freedom to have some clients to accept the settlement, while keeping some clients outside of it. One of these motions, filed by lawyers from Missouri and Illinois, is scheduled for a hearing January 18 before Judge Fallon. Another motion by

Drug Makers Fail To Disclose Zetia's Serious Health Risks

Posted On Jan 8, 2008 @ 02:22 PM by SEO Admin

Drug makers Merck and Schering-Plough never published the results of studies regarding Zetia, an anti-hyperlipidemic drug often prescribed to lower cholesterol levels. The studies raise issues about Zetias effect on the liver. Enhance, one research study of Zetia, was completed in April of 2006. The results of Enhance have recently been discovered. The study contains information about Zetias risks on the liver. Some patients showed elevated liver enzymes and were dropped from the study. Merck and Schering-Plough who have been criticized for not releasing the results of the Enhance study, are said to probably earn around $5 billion from Zetia sales this year. Doctors have claimed that Merck and Schering-Ploughs failure to disclose the results of their research promptly could have left the public with a view of Zetia that is misleading and more favorable in terms of its benefits and safety. The studies were conducted from 2000 to 2003 and were not posted on

New York's Passenger Bill of Rights Survives Challenge by Airline Industry Trade Group

Posted On Jan 6, 2008 @ 05:55 AM by SEO Admin

Now that we are moving past the holiday season and into the heart of winter, it is warming to know that the New York "airline passenger bill of rights" has survived an industry trade group's challenge to the law, which requires airlines, after a pre-takeoff delay of more than three hours, to ensure passengers, as needed, get electric generating service for fresh air and lights, waste removal to service restroom holding tanks and adequate food, drinking water and other refreshments. The law also creates an advocate for airline passengers within the Consumer Protection Board and empowers the state attorney general to seek civil penalties of up to $1,000 per violation per passenger. The legislation was drafted in response to the lengthy delays resulting from winter storms last year in New York City-area airports on Valentine's Day and St. Patrick's Day. Rather than return to the terminals, several airlines kept passengers on board and planes on the runway with no food

Tagged with: Consumer Issues

New York Sacks Tampa Bay Buccaneers Ploy to Deny Giants' Fans Tickets to This Weekends Playoff Game

Posted On Jan 5, 2008 @ 01:23 AM by SEO Admin

New York Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo, citing concerns about consumer fraud and other improprieties and potential illegalities, has convinced the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Ticketmaster to stop its policy of selling tickets to this Sunday's playoff game only to Florida residents. According to Cuomo, Ticketmaster's restriction of sales to one state was unprecedented. Attorney General Cuomo referred to "interstate commerce issues" and cited prohibitions against "states discriminating against other states' residents or impeding business by other states." The Bucs relented, sheepishly calling it "good will". Now all the Giants have to do is win the game. Mr. Cuomo, like his predecessor, now Governor Eliot Spitzer, has been very active in protecting the rights of consumers. Recent activity on his part includes an investigation against health insurers' physician ranking programs and an Tagged with: Events Consumer Issues

Third Department Applies Most Stringent Standards to Protect Students From Teachers' Harm

Posted On Jan 2, 2008 @ 05:01 AM by SEO Admin

Courts contnue to find it important that schools fulfill their non-delegable duty ofprotecting their students. Recently, the Appellate Division, Third Department, in Matter of Binghamton City School District v. Peacock, Docket No. 502329, held that public policy supports a no-leniency standard for teachers that instill harmon their students. The court clearly delivered this message when it held that a two-year suspensionfor a teacher who engaged in a "grossly inappropriate" relationship with a sixteen year old student was too lenient. The case centers on a teacher where there is evidence that he helped the student purchase a cell phone and spoke to her over 1300 times on the phone, and there is also an issue as to whether therelationship turned sexual.The teacher was warned at least three times by the school to desist his inappropria

Serving Chili Peppers (sort of) to Patients Undergoing Knee and Hip Replacement Surgery to Reduce Post-Surgical Pain

Posted On Dec 30, 2007 @ 11:02 PM by SEO Admin

Researchers are "hot" on the trail to finding a new way to decrease post-surgical pain following painful operations such as knee and hip replacements. Surgeons are experimenting by dripping capsaicin - the ingredient that gives chili peppers their fire, directly into open wounds during knee replacement surgeries hoping that bathing surgically exposed nerves in a high enough dose will numb them for weeks. The theory takes root from the fact that when you bite into a hot pepper, after the initial burn your tongue goes numb. Research shows that capsaicin targets key pain-sensing cells in a way that blocks pain but does not impair other nerves responsible for functions such as movement. Its effects also last relatively long, thus reducing the need for morphine and other narcotics following surgery. In a pilot program of 50 knee replacements, the half treated with capsaicin used less morphine in the 48 hours after surgery and reported less pain for two weeks as compa

Tagged with: Health Amp Science

A Concierge is a Service Available Not Only at a Hotel

Posted On Dec 26, 2007 @ 02:48 PM by SEO Admin

"Medical concierge," also known as "boutique practice" and "retainer medicine", is over 20 years old. The goal behind this form of medicine is to provide quality medical services that were formerly only able to be offerredto afffluententertainers and the like. For instance, this field promotes limiting the number of patients that each doctor sees, increasing the number and length of house visits with those patients, lengthening the time available with patients during their appointments, and the overall goal of increasing the quality of heatlth care. Many doctors pursue the field of "medical concierge" to ensure that patients are properly treated, and provided with the time and attention that the medical profession is idealized to provide. While it is easy to confuse the two, concierge medical practices differ from patient healthcare advocacy firms, such as PinnacleCare, in various respects. Concierge medical practice involve individuals that practice medicin

Tagged with: Medical Malpractice

F.B.I. Investigating Purported Failure to Test More than 200,000 Used Football Helmets At a Time When More College Players are Sustaining Concussions

Posted On Dec 23, 2007 @ 03:53 PM by SEO Admin

The F.B.I. is investigating how it was that more than 200,000 amateur football players in the United States wore used helmets this fall that were returned to the field without proper testing. The investigation concerns the purported failure of Circle System Inc., of Easton, Pa., in an apparent effort to save on labor and insurance costs, to perform a formal drop-testing procedure in which helmets are subjected to strong forces in different locations on about 2 percent of the helmets they handle as part of a safety protocol mandated by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (Nocsae). The helmets in question were used by football players ranging from 8-year-olds to Division I collegians. Helmets that crack or otherwise fail this test are supposed to be destroyed because they could leave the player susceptible to a fractured skull or brain hemorrhage. Although about 5 to 10 youngsters a year sustain such injuries, helmets have been cons

Lead Paint on Toys, Magnets that Perforate Intestines, Beads that Turn into "Date Rape Drug", and Now Asbestos: What's Next for Our Children?

Posted On Dec 20, 2007 @ 01:54 PM by SEO Admin

As if it was not enough to learn that there is lead paint on toys, that small magnets can come loose from toys and perforate intestines, and that children's Aqua Dots beads turn into "Date Rape Drug", now asbestos has been found in a variety of consumer products, including one of this season's biggest-selling Christmas toys, the CSI Fingerprint Examination Kit. The kit, made in China, is one of several items licensed by CBS after its popular "CSI" science-crime shows. The model has an array of plastic tools, inks and three types of very fine powders -- white, black and glow-in-the-dark. High levels of two types of asbestos were found in the white and the glow powder. Asbestos was also found in two brands of children's play clay, powdered cleanser, roof sealers, duct tapes, window glazing, spackling paste a

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